GDPR: What It Means For Your Business

If you’re a business owner, you have undoubtedly heard of the passing of the GDPR on May 25th, 2018. As a web development agency in Chicago, Codal has been acutely aware of this legislation and its breadth. Yet, this astronomical legislation was a long time coming- the GDPR’s construction started in December 2015.

The General Data Protection Regulation, or most commonly referred to as the “GDPR,” is a European Union privacy and security law. Now, I know what you’re thinking. How does this impact my business if I am in America and my business is based in the U.S.?

Since GDPR involves any personal data that EU citizens provide, its reach is far beyond Europe. Thus, if your business operates in the European Union, offers services/goods to EU citizens, or essentially accesses any part of the EU- you must be in compliance with the GDPR.

The GDPR is the largest cybersecurity update in the past two decades: giving data control back to the user and limiting the extent that businesses can use this information.

g1

The price for not complying? Lawsuits and fines galore. Now, that’s scary. And for the sake of user cybersecurity, it’s meant to have that fear factor. As a web application development agency in Chicago, that works with a number of companies that are affected by these laws- I understand the unease that you must being experiencing. However, we are going to delve into this cryptic legislation together and determine what it means for your business.

Taking A Bird’s Eye View

If your business falls under the breadth of the GDPR, the first thing to do would be to take a step back and look at the data being collected holistically. What are you collecting this data for, and are your users aware of these uses?

The GDPR emphasizes that users have control over their “personal data.” Forbes simplifies and lays out what this would encompass: personal identifying data (name, address, date of birth, web-based data (location, IP address, cookies), health/genetic data, biometric data, racial/ethnic data, political opinions and sexual orientation. That’s a lot of data.

If your business is using any of this information, it is pertinent that you check your privacy agreements to be in accordance with the GDPR (Article 7 in the legislation). Are users explicitly agreeing to the following ‘terms and conditions,’ that would allow you to use this data? If the answer is no, your privacy agreement may be due for a facelift. No matter what your answer is, GDPR is a reminder that your privacy agreement could probably use an update.

This is why so many users have been receiving emails asking them to review changes in these privacy agreements. I would recommend following suit: once you update the agreements, let users know of these changes and require them to re-agree.

If you’re looking for an example of GDPR compliant privacy agreements, Google has a good example of their user policy here or here.

g2

Review. And if necessary, be sure to revise promptly.

Hire A Data Protection Officer

In addition to a potential update in privacy agreements, a business should consider hiring a data protection officer, or a “DPO” for short. A data protection officer ensures that a business is adhering to all aspects of the GDPR. DPOs also work on data protection strategy and the implementation of new security protocols.

Additionally, a DPO has to conduct audits of a business’ security, train other employees about data processing, and more. Depending on the amount of data your business processes, GDPR may require you to hire a DPO.

We recommend taking a look at the GDPR legislation to see how your business fits into this requirement. Who knows, your new DPO might become your right-hand man.

Plans And Records

As the GDPR is put into effect, businesses also need to create a Record of Processing Activities (RoPA). The RoPA includes: information about the data controller, purposes of processing, and the security measures put in place. Article 30 details this portion of the GDPR in further detail.

Another important addition to the GDPR is its policy regarding data breaches. The GDPR requires companies to report breaches within 72 hours of the incident occurring. That’s a quick turnaround.

This short timeline means that companies should create policies on how they might handle a data breach. The quicker breach plans can be implemented, the sooner a business can minimize the damage and lay out its next steps – all while fitting in with the GDPR requirements.

However, if a company fails to report a data breach, they will face hefty fines. Better safe than sorry, make sure your business is in line with the GDPR requirements.

What Next?

The bottom line is that you should get your business to be GDPR compliant as soon as possible. Though the full GDPR requirements are much lengthier than this article, it’s a good starting point to refining your business’ data protocols. This includes advertising and the social media realm! Prevent the excessive fines and lawsuits – get on board with the GDPR.

And while you’re in the mindset of updating your business, get in contact with an eCommerce web design company to help your users find your security policies and privacy changes with ease.

Advertisements
GDPR: What It Means For Your Business

UX Case Studies – Tasty

Ah, Apple’s App Store. An amalgam of applications, the App Store offers something different for every user that scrolls through its never-ending rows. As an average user, I tend to avoid these uncharted app waters. However, for today’s piece, I voyaged into the App Store to look at Tasty’s app and its UX.

As a writer for a UX Company, I am aware that in order to have solid UX, an app needs to be applicable to any type of user with any range of experience. Thus, I selected an app that specializes in an area I’m not familiar with: cooking.

Normally, my version of cooking is boiling water, throwing in pasta and coating my al dente masterpiece with red sauce. Voila! Five-star cooking, in my book. Thus, for the purpose of this analysis, I am an amateur chef- at best. Which makes me an ideal candidate for Tasty’s step-by-step cooking app. Will this app make cooking seem easy? We will see.

Tasty is self-described as a “food recipes and videos” application. Created by Buzzfeed, Tasty boasts 4.9 stars on the App Store with 112.4 K reviews. With this high level of user engagement, this foodie app is rated #9 in the Food & Drink category, which is any mobile app developer’s dream!

In its App Store description, Tasty asserts that it is my “new cooking coach.” As a mediocre chef, I am clearly skeptical of this claim. Yet, all uncertainty aside, I dive into this culinary creation and download the latest iOS 10 version of the app. Get your aprons on folks, we’re about to get cooking.

Onboarding

Delving into Tasty’s app, we are welcomed by an aesthetically pleasing sign in page. Tasty’s UI is rather adorable: a bright blue background, with multi-colored pieces of food peeking out from the screen’s corners.

t1

Tasty’s account creation options are stacked at the bottom of this page. From the get-go, Tasty’s UX is versatile and they welcome any type of user. Users can create an account using their Facebook profile, their phone number- or shocking enough- with no information inputted at all. Users that don’t want to make a profile, do not have to. Tasty allows users to bypass this onboarding step with the “maybe later” option.

After I select the “log in with a phone number” option, the screen shifts to the next step. However, Tasty incorporates a creative detail in this progression. While waiting for the next page to load, there is a tiny donut that dances up and down on the screen. I am so amused by this minor detail, I almost didn’t notice the app lagging. To illustrate their app loading with a piece of food, I thought was an imaginative UX detail.

For my account creation, I am required to: input my phone number, get texted a verification code, enter that code into the app, and create a username. To my annoyance, many of the usernames that I inputted were taken. A necessary evil for many onboarding processes for apps; however, for a food app, I thought so many steps was overkill.

But all of a sudden, my qualms about the number of steps to sign-up was resolved. Users are able to scroll and select a piece of food as their profile photo. Tasty’s UX allows users to personalize their profiles. I got to choose a smiling piece of pizza for my profile- my favorite food. All is well in the food universe.

Before I could get started on my new Tasty food regiment, I am bombarded with a pop-up. For UX design agencies, pop-ups are typically a no-go; however, I thought this one was well placed. Tasty inquires if I am vegetarian or not, and promises to show me recipes with meat or without, depending on my choice. I thought this was an innovative feature of their UX: the user is able to customize their dietary preferences and restrictions.

t2

Main Interface

After I answered the series of questions presented to me, I am– finally– brought to the main page. I am greeted by rows of colorful looking recipes and their corresponding categories. Upon scrolling further, I was pleased to discover that the app has clever names for their food categories, like “Okie Dokie Artichokie,” for example.

t3At the bottom of the main interface, the page is organized by the tabs, “Discover,” “My Pages,” and “One Top” (as seen below). A solid setup for Tasty’s page, their UX is user-friendly and their layout makes sense. If I ‘discover’ a recipe I want to cook, I can save it to ‘my page’ for future reference. The flow of the main interface seems self-explanatory.

However, the “One Top” tab is dedicated to the sale of Tasty’s new cooking pan. Tasty tries to sell the pan in-app with the options, “Order yours today” or, “I have One Top.” A savvy marketing move, placed conveniently next to the other features of the app.

If we click on a recipe on the “Discover” tab, we are transported to an informational page on that particular dish. I selected an “Avocado Quinoa Power Salad” to learn about. As soon as I selected the meal- after the donut loading icon- I was brought to its interactive recipe page.

t4Tasty incorporates a quick step-by-step video at the top of the page that shows the dish being made. For any user that struggles with cooking, Tasty made it look easy. Their experience continues with an ingredients list and a slowed down version of the video at the top of the page. Tasty made me feel like even I could make that ‘powerful’ dish.

Tasty’s easy to use design doesn’t stop there. To make the dish even more convenient for their users, Tasty’s app offers to ‘export’ the recipe’s ingredient list. That’s right. Tasty is making your shopping list for you.

Final Verdict

As a writer for an app development agency, I applaud Tasty’s clever UX and appealing UI design. Furthermore, as a mediocre chef, I praise how easy their recipes seem. One thing’s for certain, I have found my new recipe book. Sayonara, bland pasta with red sauce.

UX Case Studies – Tasty

HIMSS 2018 & Codal – Disruption of The Healthcare Industry

In just a few weeks, HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society’s Annual Conference & Exhibition) will be occuring in Las Vegas, Nevada. HIMSS brings together 45,00 healthcare IT professionals. Chicago mobile app development company, Codal will be exhibiting in the conference, to continue to conduct digital transformation in healthcare across healthcare organizations across the board.

Some of the conference topics that will be heavily discussed are:

aaaa

Codal’s purpose of being at HIMSS is to create a smarter and healthier tomorrow by helping healthcare organization’s with their digital products, whether it be a web patient portal, an mHealth app, or healthcare wearable device.

Digital Transformation in Healthcare

Digital transformation in the healthcare industry is already happening. We are now accessing most of our health information via our mobile phones, and scheduling doctor appointments online. Physicians and clinics are using advanced technology to diagnose the world.

Various healthcare IT solutions have allowed for 52% of smartphone users to gather their health information on their mobile device. Along with this statistic, 80% of physicians use smartphones and medical applications, and 93% of physicians believe that mHealth apps can improve patient health. As for just standard smartphone users, 61% of them have downloaded an mHealth app on their device.

In a recent study done, one major healthcare organization that hired a UX design agency digitized and revamped their sign-up and onboarding process. The results? They were able to automate many of the important parts of the process, and improve the overall customer and patient experience. Their bounce rate was majorly reduced, by 80%, and the spending on sign-ups was reduced by 30%.

The solutions that we’re going to see at HIMSS are part of this digital transformation. There are vendors that are exhibiting that manufacture tablets specifically made for the industry, phone charging stations for hospitals, virtual care platforms, indoor navigation systems for hospitals, and the list can go on!

bbbbbb

How Codal Can Help

Some of the goals of Codal’s healthcare software solutions, is to boost patient experience and improve clinical workflows. Let’s dive deeper into this:

Patient Experience

One of the largest drivers of digital transformation in this industry, is the user, or patient. In this digital age, and as a UX company, we know that user’s expect transparency, simplicity, and a solid usability of any platform they are using. At HIMSS 2018, we’ll be showcasing some of the products that we have built that have boosted a patient experience within an organization.

One of the products includes Nemo Van, a medical transportation application for patients of various clinics and hospitals.

Improving Workflows

Not only is Codal focused on improving patient experience, but one of the major goals is to embrace automation, and promote efficiency and profitability within an organization workflows. At our booth #12253, we will be showcasing the work that we did for ACCME’s web portal.

Attending HIMSS?

If you’re attending or exhibiting at HIMSS 2018 in Las Vegas, come check out Codal’s booth (#12253). We’ll be giving away 3 free iPads, and a UX audit throughout the week!

HIMSS 2018 & Codal – Disruption of The Healthcare Industry

An AI, IoT and Healthcare Intermix

Healthcare is an industry in which there is a lot of room for error, but it is one of those industries in which technology can fill in the gaps of error. Workflows and processes may not be organized, patients are being misdiagnosed, and many physicians may not have the level of accuracy that they need. Technology such as AI (Artificial Intelligence) and IoT (the Internet of Things) can trigger a complete digital transformation in healthcare.

Medical Artificial Intelligence

AI (artificial intelligence) has already started ingraining itself in the medical field, and over the years, it will most likely hold more and more importance.

According to Forbes, researchers from Mayo Clinic have already used AI to identify genomic information of a brain tumor, without a biopsy. It also helped discover attributes that are present in an MRI scan, that a physician wasn’t even able to identify. Overall, AI can allow for more accuracy than a physician can.

Soon, every patient will be ”decoded” right in front of us by using this technology. Along with assisting with diagnosis, the array of different healthcare IT solutions are also helping developing and perfecting drugs, and can even assist in the detection of insurance fraud throughout the industry.

It is truly a life-changing, and life-saving technology.

Connected Healthcare Solutions

Taking advantage of connected healthcare solutions can also improve processes, improve patient experience, and even help correctly diagnose patients. While IoT is fairly new in a lot of industries, it has entirely ingrained itself in the healthcare & medical fields, indicating a digital transformation in healthcare.

b1

Medical IoT is not only innovative hospitals using extremely high-tech equipment, it also includes the FitBit (and any other wearable health device), Life Alerts, and various other healthcare software solutions that are connected to the Internet and a device.

While many clinics and healthcare facilities understand how IoT can help them, and no matter how many clinics and physicians have adopted this technology into their everyday lives, there are still a handful of IoT issues that need to be overcome in order to fully take advantage of what this tech can offer.

Cybersecurity, data integration, and device management are 3 of these issues that need attention. If it is easier for you to access your health data, chances are that it is easier for any hacker as well. Along with the security issue, any facility that takes on IoT, probably will have to alter their IT departments to ensure that this new technology will be properly managed.

b2

New standards and regulations will be needed in order to integrate all of the data, from all of the connected medical devices being used.

So, What’s Next?

If you’re looking for a custom healthcare IT solution, a healthcare website design, or any software development for the healthcare or medical industry, check out Codal, a Chicago-based agency specializing in these types of solutions.

Companies like Codal that help develop IT solutions can also assist in tackling any of the issues that are related to IoT, or AI.

It is also crucial to hire a UX design agency that understands the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act. Knowing all of the in’s and out’s of HIPAA compliance regulations is incredibly important if you are building any type of healthcare software development solution.

An AI, IoT and Healthcare Intermix

How Color Can Affect UX

Using color at a mobile app design agency is a lot more strategic than many people think. Individuals tend to believe that the designer chooses the color that they think is the most aesthetically pleasing, or would match their industry or brand best. While many designers do have to follow a UI or branding kit, the use and strategy of color should never be overlooked.

Colors have a huge impact on a users behavior, thoughts, emotions, and mood. The success of both a digital or physical product could depend on the choice of color. Common English phrases even sometimes use colors to describe a mood, like the phrase “feeling blue.”

Research that was conducted by Colorcom shows that it does not take very long for someone to make a judgement about a product; only 90 seconds. Within those 90 seconds, majority of the judgement is based on the color. Therefore, using color theory can advance the usability and conversion rates of the product.

b1

Blue

Blue is an extremely common color when it comes to design. This color gives off an emotion of safety, trust, happiness and friendliness. While different shades of blue can give off different meanings, almost all shades of blue will still give off a feeling of trust. Many large enterprises use this color in their branding, such as Chase, United Airlines, Charles Schwab.

Pink

The color pink gives off a feeling of joy and playfulness. While many people think that this is a feminine color, it may not be as much as you believe. Many times, pink is used for candy, sugar-based products, often associated with innocence and youth.

Black

Black typically represents power, and is used on more serious and formal digital products. However, it is a unique color that should be used with care. Although it is powerful, it can also be used to be perceived as mysterious or frightening, but sometimes sophisticated. As a UX design agency, we know that this is a color that every design teams needs to use with caution.

Check out Chase Bank’s logo below. It includes both black and blue colors, representing power and trust, which is exactly what they want their customers to perceive.

b2

Green

For fairly obvious reasons, green is typically related to all things earthy and natural, and related to the environment. Many healthy food companies use their color to grab a person’s attention, white most consumers understand what this color relates to.

Since this color is pretty natural to the eye, many calls-to-actions on websites and mobile applications are green so that the user is directed right to that button. As an app development agency, we always have to strategize where calls-to-actions should be places, and how they should look in order to increase conversion rates.

b3

Red

Similar to black, Red should also be used for carefully. It typically will represent aggression and importance. While red can represent both love and war, it is a proven color to raise awareness, whether it is good or bad. A little bit of red can go a long way.

Any company that you hire who offer’s UI design services, or even just strictly UX services, will be able to help you strategically choose your brand colors, and choose the best places on your digital product(s) for certain colors.

How Color Can Affect UX

UX Design: How to Develop Empathy Toward Your Audience

Using empathy in design is the ability to understand the emotions, feelings and goals of the target market of any digital product. Most UX design companies will utilize empathy in their user experience design process in order to ensure that their design is going to be what a user wants and needs. Using empathy is all about collecting subjective pieces of information, and analyzing it with an unbiased mindset.

One of the best ways to collect this information, is to completely insert yourself in the context of the target market of users, put yourself in their shoes, and start gaining insights into their everyday experiences.

You can start by simply watching how people interact and behave, asking potential users a series of questions, and experiencing various things first-hand. Empathy isn’t something that would be necessarily listed under ‘user experience design services,’ however, it would be used throughout different stages of the design process.

Why is Empathy Important in UX?

Empathy is important because a user experience designer is not designing just a product, they are designing the experience that a user has while they are using a product. Therefore, a UX designer needs to understand various things about their users, not just what they expect from an app.

Instead of just understanding what a user needs to perform a task, it is crucial to learn what the user’s goals are, what they are aiming for, and how they are feeling when they try to reach those goals. In order to learn these things, getting an empathic thought is critical.

You may have experienced an interaction in your life, that later made you feel more supportive or accommodating for someone else. This is similar to empathy in design; empathic design allows the designer to understand the mindset and positioning of the user.

The risks of any product design and development is on the higher side.The rewards of product design are also very high, which is why it’s so important for a UX UI design company or software development agency to utilize empathic feelings during the design research process.

Getting Started Developing Empathy

Below are four general steps to get you started gathering insights into your users world:
Exploration and Analysis

The first step is to enter the user’s world. If your app development agency is building an iOS app for the workflow of accountants, you may not know what the day-to-day life is like in an accountant’s office. You should then start by checking out the “behind the scenes” in order to get a glimpse of the life of an accountant.

This will get your mind in the zone, and start triggering more curious thoughts.

b1

Immerse Yourself

The second step is to to start collecting qualitative data while you are understanding what the day-to-day is. Start completely immersing yourself into the user’s work, by talking to an array of employees at the accounting office, taking photos, and diving deeper into what a day in the life of an accounting office is.

As another example, attend a full day of meetings, whether internal, or with clients of the accounting firm to fully immerse yourself in the experiences of an accountant.

This will allow you to empathize with the experience of users, from their point of view

Create Meaning

Now it is time to start resonating with the user, using your own experiences to connect with the user and create a bigger meaning. Sometimes, this will innately happen when you’re collecting the data altogether.

For example, you may discover that the accountants are frustrated with the fact that they all do not have a centralized place to find client documents. This may resonate with an experience you had at a college where Blackboard, or any student portal was non-existent. You begin to remember the feelings this brought you, you are able to recognize the context and have empathic feelings toward the user.

Step Back

Lastly, you need to detach yourself from being a designer and start reflecting on all of your ideas that you have collected. While these empathic insights are extremely valuable, you need to translate these feelings and insights into real ideas.

Being able to empathize with the user, allows you to design a solution experience that will solve the user’s frustrations, as a perfect end-product.

Conclusion

The best way to collect the most relevant information is to completely immerse yourself into the context of the potential users of the project. Getting empathic insights from potential users means that you will be able to design an amazing experience, and overall product. Empathic-based designs will help build a data-driven portfolio for your application development agency.

UX Design: How to Develop Empathy Toward Your Audience

Utilizing Storyboards To Understand The Users World

A lot of research and time goes into the final design that an end user sees. Before all of the pretty colors and typography is added to a website or application, there is an entire user experience process, where your UX design agency begins to understanding goals, gather requirements, and conduct research, to better understand the user, and to design with data and research in mind.

Different UX design companies will use different research techniques, such as interviews and surveys, contextual inquiry, and group workshops. Then, the UX designer will take this data and summarize their research findings into user stories or user flows. This helps the team communicate their findings and solutions to the team, along with wireframes and personas.

Personas are typically created to help the designers understanding who they are designing for, and why, and wireframes help layout the application or website, before adding the graphical aspects. So, where do storyboards come into play?

What are storyboards and why should you use them?

A storyboard is a graphical, linear set of illustrations to portray an entire story of a user completing a task. Stories are one of the most effective and powerful ways of delivering information. In user experience design services, a storyboard is a visual tool that will predict and explore the user’s interactions with the platform, to help understand the flow of someone’s interaction with product over a given time.

b1

Why storyboards? Well, a storyboard forces the designer to think about the user flow, prioritize what is important, and allows a team to work together to create a very clear picture of what is being designed, and how a user will use it.

It also helps a designer put real people at the heart of the overall UX process. When dealing with data, research and analytics, it can be difficult to put a human face on a handful of numbers. However, storyboards help put the user first.

How to get started with a storyboard

Simply start with a pen and paper, and start mapping out the most simple interactions. You can then break up your story into individual moments, and decisions that the user will make.

If your mobile app development agency is building a mobile app to help consumers diagnose a sickness, the first step might be that consumer feeling sick and staying in bed all day. After you create those first interactions, start adding emotion into the story. How does the user feel when they find the app and create an account? Next, every step, or interaction, can become a frame, emphasizing every moment and the emotions that are felt at that point. At this point, you can start adding visuals to to bring the story to life.

After you have your first draft storyboard, start adding in images and graphics, or even just sketches. Pass this along to your team, and start collaborating on the story. Your UX company or mobile app design company may find interactions that were either missed, our thought of as less-important as it should be.

Your storyboard doesn’t have to be pixel perfect, it just has to tell the story of your user. Once you have the story complete, you will be much more prepared when putting together the wireframes and overall flow of the platform.

Looking for extra assistance with your user experience? Chat with the experts at Codal!

Utilizing Storyboards To Understand The Users World